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Gilding Linocuts

Cancelling Printing Blocks
Linocut with gold leaf.  Next step is burnishing.
When  I studied with Judith Solodkinthe first woman to graduate from Tamarind Institute as a Master Lithographer,  I learned a lot about printmaking and limited editions.  One of the many lessons I learned was the importance of cancelling my plates when I was finished with an edition.
Applying gold leaf to linocut
Cancelling plates ensures the integrity of the size of my original editions, whether these editions consist of 5 prints or 75.  Cancelling plates also prevents forgeries. 
Retired linocut ready for gilding after applying an adhesive size.

I destroy my copper etching plates.  I erase my litho stones.  And I apply gold leaf to some of my linoleum blocks as a way of marking their "retirement" and preventing any further printing.



*Note: I usually apply a yellow gilding primer before applying the adhesive size.  The primer gives a polished finish.  However, with this linoleum block I wanted a more textured look with remnants of the previous inks peeking through.


Created in Baltimore
by Suzanne Coley

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