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Memory: A Visual Approach

Papermaking
Handmade paper by Suzanne Coley
When I was Director of an art program for artists with psychiatric disabilities I often visited them in psychiatric wards.  I remember during my visits from 2006 through 2011, how I increasingly became interested in how humans create and store memories. Recently, while working on The Beholder's Share show with Generous Company, I became obsessed with how brains create and store memories.

The more I learned and read, the more I wanted to create an external visual counterpart, if possible.


WORDS: I began by shredding a few of my old Greek philosophy books and a discarded novel.


What would I remember if . .  .
papermaking
I felt memories went through a delicate internal blender that somehow scrambled certain memories, like a Greek expression I used to know well when I was younger, but can no longer recall.  So, I put the shredded paper in a blender.


Handmade papers.
handmade paper
Details in the light.


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