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52 Weeks of Printmaking on Textiles: Week 52

The Journey:

Today is the final day of blogging about this year-long project of turning textiles into one-of-a-kind mixed media books.
I want to show you some of the textiles before I cut, stitched, beaded, combined, collaged, painted, manipulated, and turned them into stories.
One thing I learned about this project is: Determination and discipline will take you far.  There was very little information about turning textiles into books, and I experimented with a lot of techniques and processes.
The two main goals I had for these books were: 1. Designing the textile pages so that they stood up straight without being too stiff, distorted, and thick.  
2.  Designing the wooden covers so that the books could easily be opened, with a 360 degree range.  

 Both of these goals allowed the books to be exhibited vertically or horizontally.
Thank you for following me.  May you have a very happy and productive 2018!


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