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Color Coded

Hey all,

This is Jennifer Lin from TurtleStitch! Check out my new blog post about what I learned about color and code from Suzanne:  steamct.blogspot.com

Yesterday, I had the opportunity to meet Suzanne Coley.  She talked to me about how she loves TurtleStitch because of the ability to physically hold onto the coded artwork and how coding is a form of art. She taught me color theory and how the color thread and fabric we choose can have an effect on how the viewer sees the embroidery design.

This is what I embroidered yesterday!  I love the colors of the fabric, which help bring out the design of the code:
  • the blue on the fabric corresponds with the blue of the thread
  • the size of the red paint on the fabric is similar to the yellow thread in the center of the code 
  • this makes the design pop and is more appealing to the eye


Thanks Suzanne!

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