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Is BOOK ARTS an art form?

For years I've been asked, "Is Book Arts art?" or "I've never heard of Book Arts, what is it?"  Recently, I've been asked to define Book Arts and classify it among other art forms.  Researching the history of artists' books, I found a wide range of definitions.  None sufficiently described what I've been doing.

Therefore, to better explain the types of books I create, I needed to delve deeper into the concept, idea, structure, and language of Book Arts. The next few blog posts will be dedicated to how I define Book Arts as a book artist.

Well, first of all, I am using Book Arts as a singular "uncountable noun."  


Uncountable (also non-count) nouns are used to describe a quality, concept, action, or substance that cannot be divided into separate elements.   Non-Count nouns also refer to a whole category made up of different varieties or a whole group of things that is made of many individual parts.


I have always thought of Book Arts as falling under this category -- "whole group of things that is made of many individual parts."




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